Madeline, she/her, ..............fresh stereotypes straight outta the can

If you don’t think I mean it

Then you’ll feel it when I’m gone

I said I’m done enough of your love

I said I’m done enough of your love

(Source: teamdorkskin)

shitdickfuckmothafucka:

omgbuglen:

A warning to anybody thinking about getting a husky


You can build yourself a third husky

shitdickfuckmothafucka:

omgbuglen:

A warning to anybody thinking about getting a husky

You can build yourself a third husky

adapto:

Body comparative #47 (1,2)

gunrunnerhell:

Heard the song during the commercial for History Channel’s trailer for their upcoming Bonnie & Clyde movie. I liked the way it sounded so I had to add it to my iPod.

tampontears:

fuck what skinner says

tampontears:

fuck what skinner says

(Source: buttwyatt)

(Source: moon-meat)

andyjmac:

Tears For Fears - “Head Over Heels”

radtracks:

the safety dance // men without hats

we can dance if we want to
we can leave your friends behind
'cause your friends don't dance and if they don't dance
well, they’re no friends of mine

romanovaas:

- Imagine if you could come back and take out five people who’d caused you to suffer. Who would they be?

- I only get five? (◕‿◕。)

yourackdisciprine:

A recent trend on RTE (Irish TV) chat shows - random audience members turning to stare into the cameras during audience cut-aways.

vintagegal:

The photography of Dennis Hopper 1961-1967

During the 1960s, Dennis Hopper carried a camera everywhere—on film sets and locations, at parties, in diners, bars and galleries, driving on freeways and walking on political marches. He photographed movie idols, pop stars, writers, artists, girlfriends, and complete strangers. Along the way he captured some of the most intriguing moments of his generation with a keen and intuitive eye. A reluctant icon at the epicenter of that decade’s cultural upheaval, Hopper documented the likes of Tina Turner in the studio, Andy Warhol at his first West Coast show, Paul Newman on set, and Martin Luther King during the Civil Rights March from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. (via)